000001767 001__ 1767
000001767 005__ 20180831220744.0
000001767 037__ $$aCONFERENCE
000001767 041__ $$aeng
000001767 245__ $$aShared leadership in teams :$$bexploring the effect of relational identification on in-role performance
000001767 260__ $$aAnahaim, USA$$b5-9 August 2016$$c2016
000001767 269__ $$a2016-08
000001767 300__ $$a9 p.
000001767 506__ $$anon diffusé
000001767 520__ $$aLeading others is generally accepted  as a process by which an  individual influences another  individual  (or  collective)  to  exert  effort  in  reaching  organizational  goals (Northouse,  2010) .  As  such, leading others within organizations does not have to be tied to any particular  organizational  or  hierarchal  position  to  employ  such  influence (Wheelan  &  Johnston,  1996;  Yukl,  2013) . In  addition,  scholars  have  also  untethered leadership  from  the  notion  wherein  a  single  leader  influences  others  to  the  notion  of  shared  or  distributed  leadership  wherein  mutual  influence is  paramount (Carson,  Tesluk,  &  Marrone,  2007;  Hernandez,  Eberly,  Avolio,  &  Johnson,  2011;  Sergi,  Denis,  &  Langley,  2012) .    A  key  question  then  becomes  how  does  this  mu tual influence  develop and translate into organizationally - relevant behavior?  While there are multiple paths to  answer  this  question,  scholars  have  recently  explored  one  particular  path  – identity  – wherein  shared  identity  and/or  identification  creates  mut ual  influence  and  subsequent  organizationally - relevant behaviors  (DeRue & Ashford, 2010; Sluss & Ashforth, 2007) .  Our study , therefore, focuses on how  co - worker  dyads mutually influence each other and  how  this  mutual  influence  translates  to  in - role  performance.  More  specifically, we  investigated  how sales dyad s ’ relational identification (i.e. the extent to which the sales dyad’s relation ship is  self - defining; Sluss  &  Ash forth,  2007 )  engenders  a  sense  of  balanced  contribution  and  how  balanced contribution leads to key performance indicators (in our case, visits  to client sites).
000001767 592__ $$aHEG FR Haute école de gestion de Fribourg
000001767 592__ $$cEconomie et Services
000001767 65017 $$aÉconomie/gestion
000001767 655_7 $$afull paper
000001767 700__ $$aBubenzer, Philipp$$uSchool of Management Fribourg, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland
000001767 711__ $$aAcademy of Management Conference (AOM) 2016$$cAnaheim, USA$$d05/08/2016 / 09/08/2016
000001767 773__ $$tProceedings of the Academy of Management Conference (AOM) 2016
000001767 8564_ $$s518618$$uhttp://hesso.tind.io/record/1767/files/bubenzer_SharedLeadershipTeams_2016.pdf
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000001767 906__ $$aNONE
000001767 950__ $$aI1
000001767 980__ $$aconference