Tind Guide: Search Guide

Keyword Searching

There are three ways of keyword searching. An overview is given in the table below:

Type Syntax Can query keywords occur in different metadata fields? Can other words than query keywords occur within the same metadata field?
Broad Match No formatting Yes Yes
Partial Phrase  "Double quotes" No Yes
Exact Phrase  [Brackets] No No

Broad Match

A broad match keyword search will return results for all records that contain all keywords in the record's metadata. It also searches across all metadata fields. It will not consider which fields the keywords are located in.

Example Query Results Across Metadata Fields Results Within Metadata Fields
Consider searching for Albert Einstein The word Albert and the word Einstein do not need to occur in the same metadata field. E.g. Albert could be in the title field and Einstein in the author field. A metadata field may contain additional metadata. E.g. results will be shown for both author:Albert Einsteinand author:Robert Albert Einstein

Phrase Match

A phrase match keyword search is done by using double quotes around your keywords: "Albert Einstein". Using phrase match will return results for all records that contain these keywords in the same metadata field of a record.

Example Query Results Across Metadata Fields Results Within Metadata Fields
Consider searching for "Albert Einstein" The word Albert and the word Einstein need to occur in this order in the same metadata field. A metadata field may contain additional metadata. E.g. results will be shown for both author:Albert Einsteinand author:Robert Albert Einstein. The order of the words matter.

Exact Match

An exact match keyword search is done by brackets around your query: [Albert Einstein]. Using exact match will return results for records that contain only these exact keywords in the same metadata field of a record.

Example Query Results Across Metadata Fields Results Within Metadata Fields
Consider searching for [Albert Einstein] The word Albert and the word Einstein need to occur in the same metadata field (in at least one field). A metadata field must contain ONLY the words Albert and Einstein E.g. results will not be shown for author:Albert J. Einsteinor author:Theodor Albert Einstein

Field Search

Index Fields

The system offers the ability to search within specific metadata fields, for example the title, author or abstract field. A list of fields can be found in the advanced search dropdown menu. Field searches are conducted by typing the name of the field following a colon and the desired keyword(s), for example: author:Einstein. If multiple keywords are used within a field search, special syntaxes are required:

Search type Syntax Example Expected Behaviour
Phrase Match "double quotes" subject:"particle physics" Keywords need to be in same metadata field, but will also return results for e.g subject:high energy particle physics. The order of the words matter.
Exact Match [brackets] subject:[particle physics] Will only return results if metadata in specified field exactly matches the query.
Special characters: if a keyword includes special characters, syntax is required (such as parenthesis or quotes, e.g. author:"Saint-John"). The search engine uses the following special characters to designate syntax for and thus should be avoided in simple searching: + - = & | > < ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ ~ * ? : \ /  

MARC Fields

The system also supports search within MARC fields. To search within a MARC field, simply use the same syntax as described in the above section. Please note:

Field Syntax
MARC field To search in the main MARC field, type for example 245:"Einstein Theory of Relativity"
Subfield To search in a specific subfield, both indicators must be specified as well. For example: 24510a:"The Einstein Theory of Relativity"
WildcardsAny indicator, any subfield: 245:"query" or 245%%%:"query"
Any indicators
: 245%%a:"query" or 245%1%:"query"
Any subfield: 24510%:"query"

Advanced Search

Boolean Operators

Boolean Operators are used to connect and define the relationship between your search terms. When searching, you can use Boolean operators to either narrow or broaden your record sets. The three Boolean operators are AND, OR and NOT.

Operator Explanation
AND Searches for results that include both the term before and the term after the operator. For example: the query particle AND physics returns all records that contain both the word particle and the word physics. The query author:einstein AND author:feynman returns all records that contain both authors in the record.
OR Searches for results that include either the term before or the term after the operator (or both). For example: the query particle OR physics returns all records that contain either the word particle or the word physics (or both). The query author:einstein OR author:feynman returns all records that have either einstein or feynman listed as author (or both).
NOT Searches for results that do not include the term after the operator. For example the query NOT Einstein returns all records that do not contain the word Einstein. The query author:einstein NOT author:feynman returns all records that contain the author einstein but not the author feynman. If a record has both authors, it will be excluded from the results.
Case sensitive: the boolean operators (AND, OR, NOT) are only recognized if written in uppercase. This behavior is intended to avoid problems when searching for records such as with the title "The Fox and The Crow".
Multiple Fields
Building queries within an index: when searching for e.g. multiple subjects or collections, the following syntax must be applied:  subject:"Engineering" AND subject:"Physics" . This query would list you results that have both subjects. Please note that the following syntax would NOT provide you with results that have both subjects, rather, it would look for records that have a single subject called "Engineering Physics": subject:"Engineering AND Physics"

Truncation

Truncation is a technique that broadens your search to include various word endings and spellings. To use truncation, enter the root of a word and put the symbol (*) at the end. The system will return results that include any ending of that root word. Examples:

Example query Will also return results for
child* child, childs, children, childrens, childhood
genetic* genetic, genetics, genetically

Range 

Ranges can be specified for date, numeric and string fields. The following syntaxes are supported for range search:

Syntax Explanation
-> Include range values
> Greater than
< Less than
= Equals exactly


Below are examples for common range searches:

Type Example Explanation
Date range year:2012->2013 Search for all dates in 2012 and 2013
Item count itemcount:1->5 All records with minimum 1 item and max 5 items
Item count itemcount:<10 All records with less than 10 items
Item count itemcount:>=10 All records with 10 or more items