Somatosensory plasticity in pediatric cerebral palsy following constraint-induced movement therapy

Matusz, Pawel (The LINE (Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology), Radiology Department and Neuropsychology Service, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Switzerland ; University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO Valais-Wallis)) ; Key, Alexandra (Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences & Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA) ; Gogliotti, Shirley (Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA) ; Pearson, Jennifer (Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA) ; Auld, Megan (School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia) ; Murray, Micah (The LINE (Laboratory for Investigative Neurophysiology), Radiology Department and Neuropsychology Service, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Switzerland ; Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences & Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA ; EEG Brain Mapping Core, Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Switzerland ; Department of Ophtalmology, University of Lausanne, Fondation Asile des Aveugles, Switzerland) ; Maitre, Nathalie (Department of Hearing and Speeches Sciences & Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA ; Department of Pediatrics and Center for Perinatal Research, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, USA)

Cerebral palsy (CP) is predominantly a disorder of movement, with evidence of sensory-motor dysfunction. CIMT1 is a widely used treatment for hemiplegic CP. However, effects of CIMT on somatosensory processing remain unclear. To examine potential CIMT-induced changes in cortical tactile processing, we designed a prospective study, during which 10 children with hemiplegic CP (5 to 8 years old) underwent an intensive one-week-long non-removable hard-constraint CIMT. Before and directly after the treatment, we recorded their cortical event-related potential responses (ERPs) to calibrated light touch (versus a control stimulus) at the more and less-affected hand. To provide insights into the core neurophysiological deficits in light touch processing in CP as well as into the plasticity of this function following CIMT, we analyzed the ERPs within an electrical neuroimaging framework. After CIMT, brain areas governing the more affected hand responded to touch in configurations similar to those activated by the hemisphere controlling the less-affected hand before CIMT. Furthermore, dysfunctional patterns of brain activity, identified using hierarchical ERP cluster analyses, appeared reduced after CIMT in proportion with changes in sensory-motor measures (grip or pinch movements). These novel results suggest recovery of functional sensory activation as one possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of intensive constraint-based therapy on motor functions in the more affected upper extremity in CP. However, maladaptive effects on the less-affected, constrained extremity may also occur. Our findings also highlight the use of electrical neuroimaging as feasible methodology to measure changes in tactile function after treatment even in young children, as it does not require active participation.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Economie et Services
School:
HEG-VS
Institute:
Institut Informatique de gestion
Subject(s):
Economie/gestion
Date:
2018-11
Pagination:
34 p.
Published in:
Neural plasticity
Numeration (vol. no.):
Vol. 2018, Article ID 1891978
DOI:
ISSN:
0792-8483
Appears in Collection:



 Record created 2018-11-05, last modified 2019-11-28

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