Post-focus expansion of ion beams for low fluence and large area MeV ion irradiation : application to human brain tissue and electronics devices

Whitlow, Harry J. (Departement of Physics, Louisiana Accelerator Center, university of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA ; School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Guibert, Edouard (School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Jeanneret, Patrick (School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Homsy, Alexandra (School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Roth, Joy (School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Krause, Sven (School of Engineering – HE-Arc Ingénierie, HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Roux, Adrien (School of Engineering, Architecture and Landscape (hepia), HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Eggermann, Emmanuel (School of Engineering, Architecture and Landscape (hepia), HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Stoppini, Luc (School of Engineering, Architecture and Landscape (hepia), HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland)

Irradiation with ∼3 MeV proton fluences of 106–109 protons cm−2 have been applied to study the effects on human brain tissue corresponding to single-cell irradiation doses and doses received by electronic components in low-Earth orbit. The low fluence irradiations were carried out using a proton microbeam with the post-focus expansion of the beam; a method developed by the group of Breese [1]. It was found from electrophysiological measurements that the mean neuronal frequency of human brain tissue decreased to zero as the dose increased to 0–1050 Gy. Enhancement-mode MOSFET transistors exhibited a 10% reduction in threshold voltage for 2.7 MeV proton doses of 10 Gy while a NPN bipolar transistor required ∼800 Gy to reduce the hfe by 10%, which is consistent the expected values.


Note: Part of special issue: Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Nuclear Microprobe Technology and Applications


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Ingénierie et Architecture
School:
HE-Arc Ingénierie
Institute:
Aucun institut
Subject(s):
Ingénierie
Date:
2017-08
Pagination:
5 p.
Published in:
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Numeration (vol. no.):
2017, vol. 404, pp. 87-91
DOI:
ISSN:
0168-583X
Appears in Collection:

Note: The status of this file is: restricted


 Record created 2019-03-26, last modified 2019-04-23

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