Depressive symptoms, alcohol use and coping drinking motives : examining various pathways to suicide attempts among young men

Grazioli, Véronique S. (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Bagge, Courtney L. (Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of Mississipi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA) ; Studer, Joseph (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Bertholet, Nicolas (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Rougemont-Bücking, Ansgar (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun (La Source, School of nursing sciences, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Western Switzerland, Lausanne) ; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Gmel, Gerhard (Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland; Institute of Social, and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; Addiction Switzerland, Lausanne, Switzerland; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; University of the West of England, Bristol, United Kingdom)

Background Research has identified several correlates of suicidal behaviors including depressive symptoms, alcohol use and coping drinking motives. However, their associations and their role as possible causal mechanisms in the prediction of suicide attempt are not well understood. This study examined, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally, the potential pathways from alcohol use, drinking coping motives, and depression to suicide attempts. Methods Participants (N = 4617) were young Swiss men (mean age = 19.95) participating in the Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors. Measures of depressive symptoms, alcohol use (total drinks per week, heavy episode drinking) and coping drinking motives were used from the baseline and/or 15-month follow-up assessments to predict follow-up suicide attempt. Results Main findings showed indirect associations through depressive symptoms, such that coping drinking motives were positively associated with depressive symptoms, which were in turn positively related to suicide attempts over time (for total drinks per week models, cross-sectional model: B = 0.130, SE = 0.035, 95% CI = 0.072, 0.207; longitudinal model: B = 0.039, SE = 0.013, 95% CI = 0.019, 0.069). Alcohol use was not significantly related to suicide attempt. Limitations Main limitation includes a low prevalence rate for suicide attempt potentially reducing power effects in the analyses and our focus on distal—yet not proximal, role of alcohol use on suicide attempt. Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that young men with depressive symptoms and/or those who use alcohol to cope with negative affect may benefit from programs targeting suicidal behaviors.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Santé
School:
La Source
Institute:
Secteur Recherche et Développement (Ra&D) de l'Institut et Haute Ecole de la Santé La Source
Subject(s):
Santé
Date:
2018-01
Pagination:
9 p.
Published in:
Journal of Affective Disorders
Numeration (vol. no.):
2018, vol. 232, pp. 243-251
DOI:
ISSN:
01650327
Appears in Collection:

Note: The status of this file is: restricted


 Record created 2019-04-15, last modified 2019-05-13

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