Global variation in the beta diversity of lake macrophytes is driven by environmental heterogeneity rather than latitude

Alahuhta, Janne (Geography Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland) ; Kosten, Sarian (Department of Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) ; Akasaka, Munemitsu (Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agricultural and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo, Japan) ; Auderset, Dominique (Department F.‐A. Forel for Environmental and Aquatic Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland) ; Azzella, Mattia M. (Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy) ; Bolpagni, Rossano (Department of Chemistry, Life Sciences and Environmental Sustainability, University of Parma, Parma, Italy) ; Bove, Claudia (Departamento de Botânica, Museu Nacional, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil) ; Chambers, Patricia A. (Environment and Climate Change Canada, Burlington, ON, Canada) ; Chappuis, Eglantine (Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Blanes, Spain) ; Clayton, John (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited, Hamilton, New Zealand) ; de Winton, Mary (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Limited, Hamilton, New Zealand) ; Ecke, Frauke (Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden ; Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Umeå, Sweden) ; Gacia, Esperança (Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes (CEAB), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Blanes, Spain) ; Gecheva, Gana (Faculty of Biology, University of Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria) ; Grillas, Patrick (Tour du Valat, Research Institute for the conservation of Mediterranean wetlands, Le Sambuc, Arles, France) ; Hauxwell, Jennifer (Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA) ; Hellsten, Seppo (Finnish Environment Institute, Freshwater Centre, Oulu, Finland) ; Hjort, Jan (Finnish Environment Institute, Freshwater Centre, Oulu, Finland) ; Hoyer, Mark V. (Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Institute of Food and Agricultural Services, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA) ; Ilg, Christiane (School of Engineering, Architecture and Landscape (hepia), HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Kolada, Agnieszka (Department of Freshwater Assessment Methods and Monitoring, Institute of Environmental Protection‒National Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland) ; Kuoppala, Minna (Finnish Environment Institute, Freshwater Centre, Oulu, Finland) ; Lauridsen, Torben (Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark) ; Li, En Hua (Key Laboratory for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Evaluation of Hubei Province, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China) ; Lukács, Balázs (Department of Tisza River Research, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Debrecen, Hungary) ; Mjelde, Marit (Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo, Norway) ; Mikulyuk, Alison (Center for Limnology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA ; Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI, USA) ; Mormul, Roger P. (Department of Biology, Research Group in Limnology, Ichthyology and Aquaculture—Nupélia, State University of Maringá, Mringá, PR, Brazil) ; Nishihiro, Jun (Faculty of Sciences, Toho University, 2‒2‒1 Miyama, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan) ; Oertli, Beat (School of Engineering, Architecture and Landscape (hepia), HES-SO // University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland) ; Rhazi, Laila (Laboratory of Botany, Mycology and Environment, Faculty of Sciences, Mohammed V University in Rabat, Rabat, Morocco) ; Rhazi, Mouhssine (Department of Biology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Moulay Ismail University, Errachidia, Morocco) ; Sass, Laura (Illinois Natural History Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, USA) ; Scheanz, Christine (Bavarian Environment Agency, Wielenbach, Germany) ; Sondergaard, Martin (Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Silkeborg, Denmark) ; Yamanouchi, Takashi (Faculty of Sciences, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba, Japan) ; Yu, Qing (State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China ; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China) ; Wang, Haijun (State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China) ; Willby, Nigel (Biological and Environmental Science, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK) ; Zhang, Xiao Ke (School of Life Sciences, Anqing Normal University, Anqing, China) ; Heino, Jani (Finnish Environment Institute, Natural Environment Centre, Biodiversity, Oulu, Finland)

Aim : We studied global variation in beta diversity patterns of lake macrophytes using regional data from across the world. Specifically, we examined (1) how beta diversity of aquatic macrophytes is partitioned between species turnover and nestedness within each study region, and (2) which environmental characteristics structure variation in these beta diversity components. Location : Global. Methods : We used presence–absence data for aquatic macrophytes from 21 regions distributed around the world. We calculated pairwise‐site and multiple‐site beta diversity among lakes within each region using Sørensen dissimilarity index and partitioned it into turnover and nestedness coefficients. Beta regression was used to correlate the diversity coefficients with regional environmental characteristics. Results : Aquatic macrophytes showed different levels of beta diversity within each of the 21 study regions, with species turnover typically accounting for the majority of beta diversity, especially in high‐diversity regions. However, nestedness contributed 30–50% of total variation in macrophyte beta diversity in low‐diversity regions. The most important environmental factor explaining the three beta diversity coefficients (total, species turnover and nestedness) was elevation range, followed by relative areal extent of freshwater, latitude and water alkalinity range. Main conclusions : Our findings show that global patterns in beta diversity of lake macrophytes are caused by species turnover rather than by nestedness. These patterns in beta diversity were driven by natural environmental heterogeneity, notably variability in elevation range (also related to temperature variation) among regions. In addition, a greater range in alkalinity within a region, likely amplified by human activities, was also correlated with increased macrophyte beta diversity. These findings suggest that efforts to conserve aquatic macrophyte diversity should primarily focus on regions with large numbers of lakes that exhibit broad environmental gradients.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Ingénierie et Architecture
School:
HEPIA - Genève
Institute:
inTNE - Institut Terre-Nature-Environnement
Date:
2017-02
Pagination:
12 p.
Published in:
Journal of Biogeography
Numeration (vol. no.):
2017, vol. 44, no. 8, pp. 1758-1769
DOI:
ISSN:
0305-0270
Appears in Collection:

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 Record created 2020-08-14, last modified 2020-10-27

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