Changes in spatio-temporal gait parameters and vertical speed during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon

Jeker, David (Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Falbriard, Mathieu (Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Vernillo, Gianluca (Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; CeRiSM, Research Centre ‘Sport, Mountain and Health’, University of Verona, Rovereto, Italy) ; Meyer, Frederic (Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Savoldelli, Aldo (CeRiSM, Research Centre ‘Sport, Mountain and Health’, University of Verona, Rovereto, Italy) ; Degache, Francis (HESAV School of Health Sciences, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland) ; Schena, Federico (CeRiSM, Research Centre ‘Sport, Mountain and Health’, University of Verona, Rovereto, Italy; Department of Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy) ; Aminian, Kamiar (Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Millet, Grégoire P. (Institute of Sport Sciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland)

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of altitude and distance on uphill vertical speed (VS) and the main spatio-temporal gait parameters during an extreme mountain ultra-marathon. The VS, stride height (SH) and stride frequency (SF) of 27 runners were measured with an inertial sensor at the shank for two different altitude ranges (low 1300–2000 m vs high 2400–3200 m) of 10 mountains passes distributed over a 220 km course. There was a significant interaction (F(4,52) = 4.04, p < 0.01) for the effect of altitude and distance on VS. During the first passes, the mean VS was faster at lower altitudes, but this difference disappeared at a quarter of the race length, suggesting that neuromuscular fatigue influenced the uphill velocity to a larger extent than the oxygen delivery. The average VS, SH and SF were 547 ± 135 m/h, 0.23 ± 0.05 m and 0.66 ± 0.09 Hz. The individual VS change for each uphill portions was more strongly correlated with the changes in SH (r = 0.80, P < 0.001, n = 321) than SF (r = 0.43, P < 0.001, n = 321). This suggests a large effect of the knee extensors strength loss on the diminution of VS.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Santé
Branch:
Physiothérapie
School:
HESAV
Institute:
Unité de recherche en santé, HESAV
Date:
2020-01
Pagination:
8 p.
Published in:
European journal of sport Ssience
Numeration (vol. no.):
2020, vol. 20, no. 10, pp. 1339-1345
DOI:
ISSN:
1746-1391
Appears in Collection:

Note: The status of this file is: restricted


 Record created 2020-11-27, last modified 2020-12-01

Fulltext:
Download fulltext
PDF

Rate this document:

Rate this document:
1
2
3
 
(Not yet reviewed)