Sprint specificity of isolated hamstring-strengthening exercises in terms of muscle activity and force production

Prince, Caroline (University of Savoie Mont Blanc, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité (EA7424), Chambéry, France ; Physiotherapy and Sports Medicine Department, Swiss Olympic Medical Center, La Tour Hospital, Meyrin, Switzerland) ; Morin, Jean-Benoît (University of Lyon, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Inter-university Laboratory of Human Movement Science (LIBM EA 7424), Saint-Étienne, France ; Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand, School of Sport and Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand) ; Mendiguchia, Jurdan (Department of Physical Therapy, ZENTRUM Rehab and Performance Center, Barañain, Spain) ; Lahti, Johan (University of Côte d'Azur, LAMHESS, Nice, France) ; Guex, Kenny (HESAV School of Health Sciences, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland ; Head Coach Sprint/Hurdles/Relays Coach 400m/400m Hurdles Swiss Athletics, Haus des Sports, Ittigen, Switzerland) ; Edouard, Pascal (University of Lyon, UJM-Saint-Etienne, Inter-university Laboratory of Human Movement Science (LIBM EA 7424), Saint-Étienne, France ; Sports Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Regional Institute of Medicine and Sports Engineering (IRMIS), University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Ètienne, France) ; Samozino, Pierre (University of Savoie Mont Blanc, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire de Biologie de la Motricité (EA7424), Chambéry, France)

To train hamstring muscle specifically to sprint, strengthening programs should target exercises associated with horizontal force production and high levels of hamstring activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to analyze the correlation between force production capacities during sprinting and hamstring strengthening exercises, and to compare hamstring muscle activity during sprinting and these exercises. Fourteen track and field regional level athletes performed two maximal 50-m sprints and six strengthening exercises: Nordic hamstring exercises without and with hip flexion, Upright-hip-extension in isometric and concentric modalities, Standing kick, and Slide-leg-bridge. The sprinting horizontal force production capacity at low (F0) and high (V0) speeds was computed from running velocity data. Hamstring muscle performances were assessed directly or indirectly during isolated exercises. Hamstring muscle electromyographic activity was recorded during all tasks. Our results demonstrate substantially large to very large correlations between V0 and performances in the Upright-hip-extension in isometric (rs = 0.56; p = 0.040), Nordic hamstring exercise without hip flexion (rs = 0.66; p = 0.012) and with 90° hip flexion (rs = 0.73; p = 0.003), and between F0 and Upright-hip-extension in isometric (rs = 0.60; p = 0.028) and the Nordic hamstring exercise without hip flexion (rs = 0.59; p = 0.030). However, none of the test exercises activated hamstring muscles more than an average of 60% of the maximal activation during top-speed sprinting. In conclusion, training programs aiming to be sprint-specific in terms of horizontal force production could include exercises such as the Upright-hip-extension and the Nordic hamstring exercise, in addition to maximal sprinting activity, which is the only exercise leading to high levels of hamstring muscle activity.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Santé
School:
HESAV
Institute:
Unité de recherche en santé, HESAV
Date:
2021-01
Pagination:
10 p.
Published in:
Frontiers in sports and active living
Numeration (vol. no.):
January 2021, vol. 2, art. 609636
DOI:
ISSN:
2624-9367
Appears in Collection:



 Record created 2021-01-28, last modified 2021-02-18

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