Bonobos engage in joint commitment

Heesen, Raphaela (Institute of Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland) ; Bangerter, Adrian (Institute of Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland) ; Zuberbühler, Klaus (School of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, UK ; Institute of Biology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland) ; Rossano, Federico (Cognitive Science Department, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA) ; Iglesias, Katia (School of Health Sciences, HES-SO Fribourg) ; Guéry, Jean-Pascal (Zoological Park La Vallée des Singes, Romagne, France) ; Genty, Emilie (Institute of Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Neuchâtel, Neuchâtel, Switzerland)

Joint action is central to human nature, enabling collectives to achieve goals otherwise unreachable by individuals. It is enabled by humans’ capacity to understand and engage in joint commitments. Joint commitments are evidenced when partners in interrupted joint actions reengage one another. To date, there is no clear evidence whether nonhuman animals understand joint commitment, suggesting that only humans experience it. Here, we revisit this claim by interrupting bonobos engaged in social activities. Bonobos reliably resumed the activity, and the likelihood of resumption was higher for social compared to solitary activities. Furthermore, communicative efforts deployed to suspend and resume social activities varied depending on partners’ social relationships and interactive roles. Our results suggest that bonobos, like humans, engage in joint commitment and have some awareness of the social consequences of breaking it.


Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Santé
School:
HEdS-FR
Institute:
Recherche appliquée et développement Santé HEDS-FR
Date:
2020-12
Pagination:
11 p.
Published in:
Science Advances
Numeration (vol. no.):
2020, vol. 6, no. 51, eabd1306
DOI:
ISSN:
2375-2548
Appears in Collection:



 Record created 2021-02-15, last modified 2021-02-15

Fulltext:
Download fulltext
PDF

Rate this document:

Rate this document:
1
2
3
 
(Not yet reviewed)