Development of alcohol use disorder in Young Swiss men : the influence of retrospectively perceived parenting profiles

Baudat, Sophie (Division of Prison Health, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland ; Family and Development Research Center, Institute of Psychology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Iglesias, Katia (School of Health Sciences, HES-SO Fribourg) ; Studer, Joseph (Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland) ; Gmel, Gerhard (Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland ; Addiction Switzerland, Lausanne, Switzerland ; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada ; University of the West of England, Coldharbour Ln, Stoke Gifford, Bristol, UK) ; Baggio, Stéphanie (Division of Prison Health, Geneva University Hospitals and University of Geneva, Thônex, Switzerland ; Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland)

This four-wave longitudinal study aimed to examine the associations between retrospectively perceived parenting profiles in adolescence and the development of alcohol use disorder (AUD) throughout emerging adulthood. The cohort consisted of 190 young Swiss men who completed retrospective reports of parenting at baseline and a short AUD self-report screening tool at four measurement times (mean age at baseline ¼ 20.18; Time 1: 21.52; Time 2: 25.61; Time 3: 26.99). Latent profile analysis revealed three parenting profiles in adolescence based on retrospective measures of parenting styles and practices: Optimal (the highest levels of involvement, structure and knowledge; 69%), Uninformed (high levels of involvement, moderate levels of structure and the lowest levels of knowledge; 17%), Low Support (the lowest levels of involvement, moderate levels of structure and knowledge; 14%). Using latent growth curve analysis, we found that young men in the Low Support profile experienced a greater increase in AUD severity compared with those in the Uninformed and Optimal profiles. Young men in the Uninformed profile reported higher levels of AUD severity at baseline than those in the Optimal profile. These findings highlight the associations between retrospectively perceived parenting profiles during adolescence and the development of AUD during emerging adulthood.


Keywords:
Article Type:
scientifique
Faculty:
Santé
School:
HEdS-FR
Institute:
Recherche appliquée et développement Santé HEDS-FR
Date:
2020-10
Pagination:
11 p.
Published in:
Drugs : Education, Prevention and Policy
Numeration (vol. no.):
2020
DOI:
ISSN:
1465-3370
Appears in Collection:

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 Record created 2021-02-15, last modified 2021-02-15

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